Recruitment - words to know

If you're thinking of applying for a job at Reed, it's really important you know the lingo! We have a few key industry phrases that will help you with both the interview process and, if successful, you first couple of months on the job

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If you're thinking of applying for a job at Reed, it's really important you know the lingo! We have a few key industry phrases that will help you with both the interview process and, if successful, you first couple of months on the job. These are our "words to know" and we recommends learning them if you're serious about a career in recruitment:

Client

Your client is the company that you are finding candidates for. They are the one’s that pay you for each placement so are the most important relationships you can make!

Retained Recruitment

Retained recruiting firms have an exclusive contract with the hiring company, and the company often pays an upfront fee (whether a candidate is hired or not). Retained recruiters have a more strategic relationship with your company, and together you’ll develop a candidate profile and sourcing plan. Qualified candidates are presented to your company on an ongoing basis until your company makes a hire. Retained recruitment is commonly used by companies with several open positions, when a position is challenging to fill or when candidate quality is paramount.

Candidate

Individual who has successfully completed all assessment requirements for a specific position and is eligible to be considered for a particular role.

Competencies

Measurable or observable combination of knowledge, skills, abilities, and other related behaviours necessary to successfully perform a specific job.

Company Culture

The values, routines, work environment, management structures, expectations, and objectives of a company.

Contingent Recruitment

With contingent recruitment more than one company competes to fill an open position for a ‘client’.. The contingency organisation collects a fee only if the company hires their candidate. Contingent recruitment can be attractive to businesses due to the low initial investment; however, the placement fees are typically more expensive, and contingent recruiters are unlikely to take on hard-to-fill roles. Since the contingent recruiter is financially motivated, the focus may tend toward candidate quantity over quality.

Social recruiting

Using social networks to find and attract candidates. Recruiters may engage in such activities as posting job ads and employer brand content on social networks, and engaging in groups on social websites.

Sourcing

Exhaustive searching and networking methods used by recruiters to find (source) and attract top talent to vacant positions.

Transferable Skills

Refer to a candidate’s skills that are able to be utilised in a variety of industries or across a number of different types of jobs.

Direct Hire

Term used when a candidate is not an employee of the staffing company.

Executive Search

The primary difference between retained search and executive search is that executive search focuses on the senior-most candidates for upper management/C-suite roles and also board directors—roles that have the highest level of impact on the firm. Executive search firms work on fewer roles at a time, making this type of individual search the costliest.

Job Description

A general statement of job duties and responsibilities.

Job Posting

Document used to recruit candidates for a vacant position; e.g., job duties and qualifications, candidate screening methods and the terms and conditions of employment.

Recruitment Time-line

Schedule outlining the recruitment steps and time-line required to complete each phase of the recruitment process.

Retained Recruitment

Retained recruiting firms have an exclusive contract with the hiring company, and the company often pays an upfront fee (whether a candidate is hired or not). Retained recruiters have a more strategic relationship with your company, and together you’ll develop a candidate profile and sourcing plan. Qualified candidates are presented to your company on an ongoing basis until your company makes a hire. Retained recruitment is commonly used by companies with several open positions, when a position is challenging to fill or when candidate quality is paramount.

RPO (Recruitment Process Outsourcing)

This is where an employer (such as Royal Mail) transfers all or part of its recruitment processes to an external company. In this case REED is representing the Royal Mail in hiring staff. An RPO provider can use the company brand name in order to provide a seamless service to the candidate. RPO teams can work on site with the client or in their own separate offices.

Social recruiting

Using social networks to find and attract candidates. Recruiters may engage in such activities as posting job ads and employer brand content on social networks, and engaging in groups on social websites.

Sourcing

Exhaustive searching and networking methods used by recruiters to find (source) and attract top talent to vacant positions.

Transferable Skills

Refer to a candidate’s skills that are able to be utilised in a variety of industries or across a number of different types of jobs.

If you have any questions about these or about Reed, get in touch!